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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You know you are a sick gun nut when you buy your guns in multiples because of the "what if". I find myself stocking up for my kids because I truly believe they will be outlawed by the time they come of age. Either that or they will be so expensive they will be untouchable unless you are rich.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Yep. Got several lowers, then bought the uppers. I have the kits and stocks as well. When they are old enough, they can build them. My oldest was first in a gun shop when he was 1 week old. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I like the way you think, Slugger. You've just given me a new thought on "long-term investment". ;-)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i thought during the last AWB that the lower had to be assembled into a rifle to be considered a pre-ban lower.
i could be wrong though
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well you can hang those lowers in your garage since ammo will be the limiting factor in the future.

I may pick up another stripped lower since I just built my second AR.

Hmmmmmm

6.8, SDM, Recce :p
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i thought during the last AWB that the lower had to be assembled into a rifle to be considered a pre-ban lower.
i could be wrong though
If they did not do that then, I am sure they will do that for the next ban. Nothing like have a stripped lower that you can't build up. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How would you even enforce something like that though?

Unless you stop selling LPKs, buffer tubes, and parts for uppers then it would impossible.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Also, don't AWB's rules prevent the legal transfer of any sort of a list-included weapon/ammo including within immediate family, much like that of existing Class III/NFA restrictions?

Obviously it would be very difficult to enforce & this is simply my opinion, but... would you want your kids to face trouble trying to use,sell or even rid themselves of these items simply because daddy had them & didn't take proper precautions? I'd even say run it by your lawyer first, just to be clear on your options on 'keeping them in the family'...just tryin' to watch out for ya! ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How would you even enforce something like that though?

Unless you stop selling LPKs, buffer tubes, and parts for uppers then it would impossible.

It would be hard to enforce but not impossible. Have you ever had to registered guns before? Well I have. In Las Vegas we have to register all handguns. I am sure if I would have just brought the upper serial number part, then they probably would have not registered it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It would be hard to enforce but not impossible. Have you ever had to registered guns before? Well I have. In Las Vegas we have to register all handguns. I am sure if I would have just brought the upper serial number part, then they probably would have not registered it.

All of my firearms are registered.

I am not sure what comparing registering a handgun has to do with buying a lower that was already a registered part on it's own and adding non registered parts after the fact.

You could do it moving forward but not really retro.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
once you buy the lower and pick it up from your ffl it is a registered gun weather you have the upper on it or not
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Who'd you register them with? There's no Registration law in SC.

Do you mean the Fed form 4473, which is kept by the FFL you bought the firearm from?
not the same thing. That basically is just a form to legally transfer a gun to you.

In Las Vegas you actually have to register all handguns when you move into town, you have to physically bring your gun to the police station, and they will proceed to take down the serial number and put it in their system. they then give you a "blue card" that indicates that the gun is registered with Las Vegas Metro and is now legal to be in Clark County.

My point is, say if a registration law was to go into effect, and say the law only allows for complete firearms to be registered, well this is not hard to check or enforce. I am sure if you try to bring in a stripped lower they will not register it. But I do see one way around this though, say if they give you 12 months to register, then all you have to do is swap uppers and parts to each lower before you go in and register it :mrgreen:
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
OK, to touch on a few points here.

1. It was legal to build lowers (or even complete guns) during the AWB. The catch was, they had to be built as ban compliant. meaning no features that scared legislators that didn't know any better or did know better and just didnt' care. 2 or more of the following: Collapsible stocks, bayo lugs, pistol grip, flashider, threaded barrel, detachable mags, not more than 10 round mags, etc.

2. It is legal to transfer class 3 items to family members or anyone else, but it must be done through an SOT (special occupations tax holder) before they can take possession of it.

If you transfer a class 2 or 3 item before you're dead then the person buying it will have to pay the tax and fill out the forms and get an approval form from the DOJ/NFA/ATF and be transferred through the SOT dealer before they can actually have it. It's also usually a pay first thing, so money they pay for it (if any) will be tied up for quite some time.

After you're dead, the heir still has to apply for the licensing and fingerprints and background check through the FBI before they can "have" it, but is tax exempt in that case. There is a special form for those situations.

This is different from standard firearms, and didn't apply to the ban years either. This only applies to NFA firearms (including SBR's AOW's, Machine guns, Suppressors, Destructive Devices, etc)

3. When a firearm is transferred to you on a 4473, the serial number is logged on the form, but NICS does NOT!!!!!!!!!!!! ask for the serial number at any time, nor are they provided with it during a background check. Only after the dealer turns in his paperwork (goes out of business) is when the ATF is provided with the forms and the serial numbers, or during a routine audit.

This gets especially difficult on older firearms that do not have a serial number stamped on them at all. These were made prior to when it became law that it had to individually marked. Sorry, but I'm not sure what year that was off the top of my head, but firearms are floating around out there that are completely legal that does not have a serial number on them from the factory just because they're older than that legislation.

Tracing of a firearm serial number is usually initiated when a firearm is reported stolen.

The police agency reports this to the ATF (or maybe FBI) and the serial number is put in a database. Most of the time when a LEO asks for the serial number of your weapon they are only fishing to see if it's been stolen. Not if it's registered to you, or even who it's registered to unless of course you live somewhere that you must register them with the police.

The bad thing with the whole stolen serial number thing is, since the ATF doesn't ask for the serial when you actually buy a gun, it may already be registered as stolen before you buy it LEGALLY!!! This is something that I personally would like to see change, but that's not my call. In a situation like that, the dealer shows the ATF from the bound book where or who the firearm was aqcuired (bought from), and then the papertrail starts back to the other person or dealer that sold it to them, and so on. Though this doesn't help the person who has (er, had) the gun in the meantime.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Little bit of thread drift there. I will continue to buy guns that I can share with my kids. I've got one thing only to say about bs law that says I cant:

Shall not be infringed!!

Our Constitution was created to chain up that mangy dog called government. Not for them to twist into a leash for us.

Land of the freak, home of the slave
Slugger
 
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