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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, well, as the title implies, my brand new Bushy has jammed with a spent casing still in the chamber. I have separated the upper and lower and removed the bolt assembly from the upper to see if I could somehow get some pliers on it, but no luck as the pliers are to big to fit inside. I tried knocking the shell out with a cleaning rod, not so much. The casing is jammed in there pretty good. My guess is that it was a bad case and expanded when it was fired. Is there anything I can do short of sending it to a gunsmith to remove it? I really don't want to spend the money if I dont have to. Thanks.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I had something like that happen to me once. My AR got a case stuck in the chamber. It wouldnt come open or anything. I just pulled and jiggled the charging handle a bit and it eventually came out. Seems like if you got the bolt out that what I did wont work for you. Good luck to you hopefully it will come out.

Nate
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, at first the bolt didn't want to come out, but after working with it a little, it came out but the case didn't follow.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the only thing I can think of is using the cleaning rod.. I'm surprised that didn't work. Maybe you need to work at it more with that? Is it a 1 piece rod or a multi section rod?

I think they make a broken casing remover or something too. I don't know if that'd apply in this case or not. Try searching for one and see if you find anything. Other than that, I don't know what to tell you. I really would think that the cleaning rod would work.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Rollerman said:
What was the ammo you were shooting. I've got 4,000 rounds through my Ar15 match service rifle without a single malfunction, handloads only!
www.compasslake.com. made mine.
Wolf. I think my next step is to remove the barrel so maybe I can get some pliers on the case. Probably beyond my capability though.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Use a wooden dowel that is the closet to the bore diameter, preferrably oak (buy 2).

  • Butt stock on the ground/ muzzle up
  • Pour oil down the bore (~ 2 - 3 tablespoons)
  • Drop the dowel into the bore
  • Cut one dowel ~ 1/2" - 3/4" longer than the barrel end
  • Smack the dowel with something hard like brass or auminum. If you use steel, place a doubled over towel over the end of the dowel
  • Repeat until the dowel is near flush with the end of the barrel
  • Use a second dowel if the case is still lodged (cutting the dowel described in step 4
  • Repeat as necessary using the 2 dowels stacked and cropped as necessary
It will come out.

Cleaning rods are a last resort in my opinion.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
bkelm18 said:
Tried that. Bent the cleaning rod. :D Lol.
PB blaster and a hard wood dowel.....spray it and beat the dowel with a hammer.buy a couple of dowels incase they break. Only let it stick out of the barrel a few inches though, it won't flex so bad then.

Other than that, you drill a hole through the case, get a long piece of all-thread and stick it out the barrel and put a nut on it and use it like a slide hammer. If the rim breaks off, you should be able to curl the case with some needle nose pliers or a broken case extractor....

Red02duece beat me to it.....
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Red02Deuce said:
Use a wooden dowel that is the closet to the bore diameter, preferrably oak (buy 2).

  • Butt stock on the ground/ muzzle up
  • Pour oil down the bore (~ 2 - 3 tablespoons)
  • Drop the dowel into the bore
  • Cut one dowel ~ 1/2" - 3/4" longer than the barrel end
  • Smack the dowel with something hard like brass or auminum. If you use steel, place a doubled over towel over the end of the dowel
  • Repeat until the dowel is near flush with the end of the barrel
  • Use a second dowel if the case is still lodged (cutting the dowel described in step 4
  • Repeat as necessary using the 2 dowels stacked and cropped as necessary
It will come out.

Cleaning rods are a last resort in my opinion.
Now that sounds like some good advice! Keep us posted and let us know how it turns out. The rest of us AR owners may find ourselves in this situation some day!

Any pics??
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
FINALLY. I had an idea, kinda along the same lines as everyone else's. My cleaning rods were too long, that's why they were bending. So I grabbed my handy dandy hacksaw and chopped down to about an inch longer than the barrel. Covered the compensator with duct tape to help prevent damage to it, then went to bloody town with the hammer. Finally popped free. There was no visible deformation of the case, only a ring of black stuff, I guess residue, around it on the side. I dunno if this is a cleaning issue or a Wolf ammunition issue. Pic of the case below. So, now I'm out a cleaning rod. I'll pick up some wooden dowels next time I'm out in case this happens again. I'm gonna head back out to the range tomorrow. Hopefully this was only a one time issue.

 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Polymere or laquer case?? I bet that it may be a slight case deformation and possibly cleaning. Remember Wolf is dirty stuff and even in my AKs I can tell when its time for a spit shine, literally.....every now and then when your shooting Wolf that is not the Gold Line, take a big nylon pipe cleaner and give the chamber a swipe with some cleaner. I've had trouble with cases in a Bulgy .223 AK in the past few months.....since the .223 isn't a true tapered round, its more prone to chamber fouling.....nothing to do with the weapon......
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
einheit 13 said:
Polymere or laquer case?? I bet that it may be a slight case deformation and possibly cleaning. Remember Wolf is dirty stuff and even in my AKs I can tell when its time for a spit shine, literally.....every now and then when your shooting Wolf that is not the Gold Line, take a big nylon pipe cleaner and give the chamber a swipe with some cleaner. I've had trouble with cases in a Bulgy .223 AK in the past few months.....since the .223 isn't a true tapered round, its more prone to chamber fouling.....nothing to do with the weapon......
It was the polymer ones. I have heard that Wolf is dirty, but this was only my second time out with the rifle and only about the 60th round of Wolf with about 100 rounds of Remington UMC the last range visit. I'm new to the AR-15 so I guess I need to learn it's nuances.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
jgrauman said:
if it happens again, try putting it in the freezer for a few hours, then tap it out :D
My freezer is pretty small, I don't think I could fit my entire upper in there. But that's a great idea. This has proven to be yet another reason for an AR-15 rifle room! Haha. I coulda swore I was gonna have to hand this over to a gunsmith, but the wealth of info here spared me the expense. Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
bkelm18 said:
My freezer is pretty small, I don't think I could fit my entire upper in there. But that's a great idea. This has proven to be yet another reason for an AR-15 rifle room! Haha. I coulda swore I was gonna have to hand this over to a gunsmith, but the wealth of info here spared me the expense. Thanks!
No, you just PM me and we get together to fix it brfore you spend $$ at a smith....
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
bkelm18 said:
FINALLY. I had an idea, kinda along the same lines as everyone else's. My cleaning rods were too long, that's why they were bending. So I grabbed my handy dandy hacksaw and chopped down to about an inch longer than the barrel. Covered the compensator with duct tape to help prevent damage to it, then went to bloody town with the hammer. Finally popped free. There was no visible deformation of the case, only a ring of black stuff, I guess residue, around it on the side. I dunno if this is a cleaning issue or a Wolf ammunition issue. Pic of the case below. So, now I'm out a cleaning rod. I'll pick up some wooden dowels next time I'm out in case this happens again. I'm gonna head back out to the range tomorrow. Hopefully this was only a one time issue.





Looks like carbon buildup.




According to the Box O' Truth,

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu18.htm

The steel cases of Wolf ammo don't expand as much as brass case ammo. That allows the gasses to get around the case and into the chamber. The gasses leave a buildup of carbon in the chamber and that causes the empty cases to stick in the chamber.
 
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