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Discussion Starter #1
Hey I just recently got a S&W M&P15 Tactical, I will be using it for fun(plinking) maybe some long range varminting, and just long range targeting in general. I have been looking at the Eotech 557, but I don't know. It has no magnification unless to buy the mag add-on. What would you guys recommend for a good all purpose scope. Pros and Cons would be great. I have never used a Eotech so I cant justify the price tag with out know more than what the brochure says. Thanks in advance
 
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Discussion Starter #2
If you bite the bullet and just get the EOtech, you wont be upset once you put it on and use it. It is the most wonderfully awesome set of optics I have ever used. The brochure does not lie.

The magnification unit is a good add on, but for my rifle, pointless so I skipped on it.

The only other good magnified scope that I would really be interested to go with on either of my rifles, would be the standard ACOG AR scope (model ?)
 
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Discussion Starter #3
If you bite the bullet and just get the EOtech, you wont be upset once you put it on and use it. It is the most wonderfully awesome set of optics I have ever used. The brochure does not lie.

The magnification unit is a good add on, but for my rifle, pointless so I skipped on it.

The only other good magnified scope that I would really be interested to go with on either of my rifles, would be the standard ACOG AR scope (model ?)
I was lookin for a ACOG for it, but the only one I ound is the trijicon. It is twice thatof the eotech lol. I am not so much worried about the price tag as I am worrried about will it be worth it in quallity.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I was lookin for a ACOG for it, but the only one I ound is the trijicon. It is twice thatof the eotech lol. I am not so much worried about the price tag as I am worrried about will it be worth it in quallity.

The reason the Trijicon was the only one you found is that Trijicon is the manufacturer of the ACOG series of scopes.

ACOGs are proven in quality, probably more so than an Eotech.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
If you dont need night-vision friendly brightness settings, go with the 512. Theyre quite a bit less expensive (~$350 if you look).

If you do, go 552
What do you think of the 557? its the new one that has the 4 dot rectile with calibrated for the .223. It has 0-300m on top,then below it has 400m, 500m and 600 m.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Why don't you just get an Eotech 512 model and the magnifier to go with it?

(unless you need night vision compatability, then the 552.A65 would be in order).

The Eotech 512 is a lot less expensive than the 552 and 557, but the only things you don't get with the 512 is NV compatible, a few less feet of waterproof if you're diving, and the quick detach mount on the 557 and the bullet drop reference points.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
What do you think of the 557? its the new one that has the 4 dot rectile with calibrated for the .223. It has 0-300m on top,then below it has 400m, 500m and 600 m.
I think at almost $200 more, I'll just use kentucky windage and elevation :D

On a serious note, I think that a no-mag reticle marked out to 600m is about on par with the WWII rifle rear sights graduated out to 2000 yards. Possibly a little more so. The EOTech (and most other reflex/red dot/holographic/whateverthehellyoucallem) was designed for speedy engagement of close-in targets. When youre shooting out to 600 yards, the EOTech really is the wrong tool for the job.

IMO, if you're gonna shoot out that far, your buying the wrong type of optic. If youre not, youre wasting money.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
For anything under 0-50 yards definately Eotech or Aimpoint. Field of view is important at these distances. ACOGs are good from 25-600 yards. 600 yards may be a bit of a reach, but the BDC will get you close enough. If you get an ACOG get something with BAC, designed to be used with both eyes open and for CQB. Even with BAC, ACOGs are not ideal for house clearing ninja missions; and I still find the 3x-4x ACOGs hard to use for CQB, but with a little practice it is not that bad.

I like Eotechs and Aimpoints but there is nothing like the clarity of ACOG glass. ACOGs are a compromise for CQB, but that glass is addicting and it for me it is hard for me to switch back to 1x red dots. Things just seems brighter, less hazy, and more clear with an ACOG. In low light conditions is where the ACOG shines. Also ACOGs are bomb proof and you don't have to flip a switch to turn it on, as it does not need batteries ans is ALWAYS on.

I have 2 and plan to pick up another one.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
As already mentioned, the ACOG's are worth the price, but you lose flexibility with a fixed magnification.

On the lower end, there is the Millett DMS-1.. 1-4x nice lower end optic.

Middle range you change up to looking at Leupold and IOR 1-4x optics, but again with these and the Millett you lose FOV.

By preference I use EOTechs, but AimPoints serve well too. That is a matter of preference. Add a flip to side magnifier and you've done as well as the ACOG's for basic performance and have more flexibility. I use the LaRue Po'Boy's for my magnification on 3 of my 4 EOTechs'. I'm more than able to hold fist sized 30rnd groups at 300m, anything beyond that I switch to the support rifle with the 10x optic.

Again, all of this is personal preference. I prefer options and the ability to adjust as needed.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Kentucky windage

In shooting, a method of adjusting the aim of your second shot by aiming to the left (or right) of the target by the same amount as you missed your target to the right (or left) on the first shot. This is obviously used when your sights aren't true, or when there are other factors boggling your aim (wind, large gravity wells etc.)
This term might come from the Kentucky Long Rifles, which were one of the first accurate long range guns. Longer range means that wind and imperfect sights have greater effects, making a new gunning term expedient. On the other hand, the term might not come from that at all. I don't think anyone really knows.
You might see Kentucky Windage referred to as Tennessee windage (this is much rarer -- but Heinlein used it in The Number of the Beast, and Google lists three pages that use it). More often it is referred to as hold-off, although hold-off seems to be used slightly more often for up and down adjustment, while Kentucky Windage is more likely to be left and right. For the most part they are interchangeable. If you want to specify up and down adjustment, you use Kentucky elevation. As you might have guessed, Kentucky Windage is an American term.
 
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