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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i'm currently in the market for an AR, and i'll probably going to get it from rock river. while comparing prices, it seems that building it will save me some $$$. but now i can't decide if i should build a 9mm version or just the regular .223.

i was thinking since i have 2 handguns that are in 9mm, i can just buy my ammo in bulk and i can use it for all my guns. but what other benefits are there?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i was thinking since i have 2 handguns that are in 9mm, i can just buy my ammo in bulk and i can use it for all my guns. but what other benefits are there?
you can shoot at indoor ranges and it's different. I went to the indoor range with mine a few days ago and the guys at the range were trying to figure out what it was.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In practical terms, it's a pistol round and will not be very effective beyond 25-50 yards. The larger calibers are rifle rounds, meaning they give you a reach out and touch someone kinda range advantage.

If cost is a concern, get the 5.56/.223 and pick up the Cerner .22 conversion.. shootin .22 at .22 costs but getting the manual of arms training and skill building from the rifle anyway.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
...get the 5.56/.223 and pick up the Cerner .22 conversion.. shootin .22 at .22 costs but getting the manual of arms training and skill building from the rifle anyway.
yeah! after doing more research i saw that! it's something i'm looking into now!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Benefits? In my humble opinion absolutely none.

The AR15 is a balance of devastating firepower and weight considerations. In 9mm you gain nothing and lose everything.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badshot
...get the 5.56/.223 and pick up the Cerner .22 conversion.. shootin .22 at .22 costs but getting the manual of arms training and skill building from the rifle anyway.

yeah! after doing more research i saw that! it's something i'm looking into now!
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The ciener kits are very good for cheaper trigger time. And if you have an indoor range you'll probably be able to use it there too.

But I don't necessarily agree that 9mm AR's are useless. I don't think anyone ever thought or intended for long range sniping with them, but under 150 yards are accurate enough and has a lot more takedown power behind it. Let's see, 75 grain .223 bullet, 147 gr 9mm bullet. Hmmm, that's about double the mass hitting the target.

Considering someone posted 25-50 yards being the maximum effective range, you've obviously never shot one and are comparing it to a handgun.

Pistol barrels are usually 5 inches or less. A non-regulated AR barrel is 16 inches long. That's a whole lot more room to build velocity in comparison. And not even taking into consideration a rifle is a more stable shooting platform than a handgun.

There are trade off's w/9mm (like max effective range), but in my opinion, not all of them are bad tradeoffs. Just intended for different things.

My 2 cents
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I went to the indoor range with mine a few days ago and the guys at the range were trying to figure out what it was.

So, the guys at the range aren't the sharpest knives in the drawer, huh? :mrgreen:
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badshot
...get the 5.56/.223 and pick up the Cerner .22 conversion.. shootin .22 at .22 costs but getting the manual of arms training and skill building from the rifle anyway.

yeah! after doing more research i saw that! it's something i'm looking into now!
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Considering someone posted 25-50 yards being the maximum effective range, you've obviously never shot one and are comparing it to a handgun.

Pistol barrels are usually 5 inches or less. A non-regulated AR barrel is 16 inches long. That's a whole lot more room to build velocity in comparison. And not even taking into consideration a rifle is a more stable shooting platform than a handgun.

There are trade off's w/9mm (like max effective range), but in my opinion, not all of them are bad tradeoffs. Just intended for different things.

My 2 cents
Here's your change... I stated the effective range and that's from my experience, oh, how did I get that experience.. RRA 9mm AR that's had both an AP and currently rides with an EOT 512. You lose so much velocity that yeah sure you can lob a 9mm round out beyond 50 yards, but get real, what practical use does it have? Oh yeah.. NONE. At best, 9mm makes a great short range subgun. That would be why it dominates a lot of CQB environments.

So either my RRA is royally screwed or I'm a horrible shot at range with pistol caliber carbines. Yeah, I'm gonna say it's neither. But hey if you think you can drop targets at 50+, then don't let my not so humble opinion stop ya.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
But I don't necessarily agree that 9mm AR's are useless. I don't think anyone ever thought or intended for long range sniping with them, but under 150 yards are accurate enough and has a lot more takedown power behind it. Let's see, 75 grain .223 bullet, 147 gr 9mm bullet. Hmmm, that's about double the mass hitting the target.


Pistol barrels are usually 5 inches or less. A non-regulated AR barrel is 16 inches long. That's a whole lot more room to build velocity in comparison. And not even taking into consideration a rifle is a more stable shooting platform than a handgun.


My 2 cents
I would definitely agree a 9mm is effective beyond 25 yards, but the 9mm doesn't have a "lot more takedown power" than the 223 at any range. With a 16" barrel you have more velocity and energy in the 223 at the muzzle and it sheds its energy a lot slower than the 9mm because of the design of the bullet. With a 50-yard zero, at 150 yards the 9mm is dropping like a rock. The 223 is basically still shooting flat and has retained a lot more velocity.

And from all the chrony info that I've found, a 9mm carbine doesn't add much velocity at all - something to the tune of 15% max. 9mm pistol powder is burned in the first few inches of barrel. In fact, with some pistol carbines (45 ACP mostly) the 16" barrel actually causes a loss in velocity due to the friction of the barrel after the powder is burned. I haven't seen that in the 9mm but it doesn't cause the 9mm bullet to suddenly become a 2000 fps projectile. You're looking at about 1300 fps vs 2700 fps or so in the 223.

I looked into both for a long time as I was deciding on my SBR, and the 223 just had too much going for it, even in the short barrel. The 223 pulls WAY ahead when you're talking 16"+ barrels and ranges above 100 yards.

You've already touched on the benefits of the 9mm - same caliber as your other guns, ability to shoot indoors and less cost depending on where you live and what hookups you have. You have to ask yourself though - if you already have a 9mm handgun that you have high-cap mags for, why go through the cost of building/buying a big heavy carbine for 5 or 10 more rounds per mag and 150 fps velocity increase? My 9mm XD holds 22 rounds with Arredondo mags and has a weaponlight on it, I couldn't justify building an 8lb rifle that has basically the same capabilities.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
But hey if you think you can drop targets at 50+, then don't let my not so humble opinion stop ya.
If you can't drop targets at 50+ yards with a 9mm rifle something is wrong. I'm not talking 150 & 200 yards, more like >/=100 yds
 
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