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Discussion Starter #1
When I get a good cheek weld (cheek bone resting on the stock) the rear sight is too high... in order to get a good sight picture I have to raise my head off of the stock.. and since I'm using iron sights I'm not getting consistent groups

anyone else have this problem? should i get an adjustable cheek rest like this http://www.commandarms.com/product.asp?pID=140&cID=57
 
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Discussion Starter #2
have you had any formal instruction on how to properly shoulder and aim a weapon? I cannot IMAGINE standard AR irons being too tall for ANYONE.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
no I haven't... I've looked for info online but haven't found anything. Any links or tips would be great... here is what I know so far (not sur eif it's right)

stock in the pocket of your shoulder
nose to charging handle
cheek resting on stock

It seems in order to get my nose to the charging handle I have to collapse the stock down a bit.. almost all the way..

I'm sure I'm doing it wrong.. any help would be greatly appreciated

have you had any formal instruction on how to properly shoulder and aim a weapon? I cannot IMAGINE standard AR irons being too tall for ANYONE.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
tough when i cannot physically manipulate you.

A lot of new shooters have a tendency to shoulder their rifle, then bring their FACE DOWN to meet the stock. this will cock your head sideways, and make the irons TOO low in your focal plane.

Stand shoulders pretty square to the target, head facing target. now, without moving your head, bring the rifle up TO your face.....until the cheek weld is there. and lean into the rifle until your nose touches the charging handle.

YOU MAY end up with only a small part of the stock on your shoulder. this means you need to "lean in" to the stock a bit more. but the whole time you head should be straight up and down. not canted or leaned to the side.

this is an old pic, but demonstrates relatively well. Use this to give you and idea and to help you break some old habits...but also look into a carbine course of some sort. you will learn a lot, not to mention have a TON of fun.


 
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Discussion Starter #5
I actually have to keep the stock even higher up on my shoulder than in your pic. Really just the last 1/3 of the bottom of the stock in in contact with my shoulder. This isn't a problem because the 5.56 has nearly zero recoil, so it's quite manageable. Plus it gives me the proper sight picture through my iron and my red dot sight.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
+1 for the pic and great advice... I'll give it a shot today and let you know how it works out

Thanks!



tough when i cannot physically manipulate you.

A lot of new shooters have a tendency to shoulder their rifle, then bring their FACE DOWN to meet the stock. this will cock your head sideways, and make the irons TOO low in your focal plane.

Stand shoulders pretty square to the target, head facing target. now, without moving your head, bring the rifle up TO your face.....until the cheek weld is there. and lean into the rifle until your nose touches the charging handle.

YOU MAY end up with only a small part of the stock on your shoulder. this means you need to "lean in" to the stock a bit more. but the whole time you head should be straight up and down. not canted or leaned to the side.

this is an old pic, but demonstrates relatively well. Use this to give you and idea and to help you break some old habits...but also look into a carbine course of some sort. you will learn a lot, not to mention have a TON of fun.


 
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Discussion Starter #7
yep the lower 1/3 or so of the stock to your shoulder....probably why they came up with this stock



 
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Discussion Starter #8
the stock/shoulder issue becomes a NON-issue if you lean into your carbine properly. probably why only 2 people own that stock, and one of them is a drawing.;)

Feet shoulder width apart. bend at the waist, and lean into the rifle, keeping a heads up shooting position. ESPECIALLY important with more powerful calibers.

but like i said earlier, having part of the stock off the shoulder is a non issue.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I did some dry fire practice today - I leaned forward, picked a spot on the wall to look at and raised the rifle to my head (with out moving my head). It definitely felt better doing it that way and I think with some practice it will feel natural

Thanks again
 
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