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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if anyone has used or heard anything about the hydrolic recoil buffer for the ar15 MidwayUSA - Buffer Technologies Enidine Hydraulic Recoil Buffer AR-15 Carbine

or the one piece gas ring for the bolt to eliminate problems with timing

MidwayUSA - DPMS Bolt Gas Ring McFarland 1-Piece AR-15

anyone have any comments or yea/nays on these items?

additionally any minor mechanical upgrades that would reduce problems in the future that are recommened would be appreciated as well as common pieces that wear easily and need replacement.

(note: if any of our sponsors have these items it's not my intention to go against them, I just pulled a search for fast results and found them at midway for the purpose of this post.)
 
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Discussion Starter #2
I have Enidine buffers in my three main ARs (2 carbine, 1 rifle) and I love them. They take a few hundred rounds to break-in, but they are sweet once they do.

They soften the recoil a bit and save wear-and-tear on your BCG to boot. They are a little expensive, but I own three, so I must think they're worth it.

Some of the most common AR issues revolve around extrator problems. It is well worth the $4 to add the BCM extractor upgrade kit (from Global Tactical) to your bolt.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the tips! Just to be sure there are two different hydraulic buffers, one says carbine, ($89) and the other rifle ($99). The carbine buffer is shorter than the rifle one, so I'm assuming the carbine one is what I want for a 16 in barrel and 6 position stock? or does it not matter which one is used other than a price difference?
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tips! Just to be sure there are two different hydraulic buffers, one says carbine, ($89) and the other rifle ($99). The carbine buffer is shorter than the rifle one, so I'm assuming the carbine one is what I want for a 16 in barrel and 6 position stock? or does it not matter which one is used other than a price difference?
It's not always the case, but for the most part: The cheaper (and smaller) carbine one is for collapsible stocks, the more expensive (and bigger) buffer is for fixed stocks.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
It's not always the case, but for the most part: The cheaper (and smaller) carbine one is for collapsible stocks, the more expensive (and bigger) buffer is for fixed stocks.
er ... I think it has to do with carbine vs rifle length gas system
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Running a heavier buffer(H) has a similar effect and is cheaper. The exception being the reduction of the recoil, which is basically nothing on an AR to start with. The heavier buffers slows the cycling of the weapon, thus making it run smoother, ie less violent extraction.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
er ... I think it has to do with carbine vs rifle length gas system
It has nothing at all to do with the gas system. You can run either size with any gas system as long as you have the correct buffer tube/buttstock.

Rifle buffers are for the full size buttstock (tubes and spring) Like the A1 and A2 stocks and Ace FX stocks, magpul PRS, etc. Basically anything with the longer tube and spring.

Car(bine) buffers are for the collapsible and fixed (short) entry length buttstocks (and pistol buffer tubes, etc)

Below is a picture of the two kinds. The longer is for rifle length and vice versa for the shorter.



Nikon777 is correct about the Hbuffers. I have a DPMS double tungsten H2 buffer in my shorty and an H buffer in my M4. They cycle fine with a standard car buffer, and I don't have any complaints with either buffer, but it does seem a little more tame with the H buffers in them.

The differences with the standard and H buffers is weight. H and H2 buffers get heavier as the number gets larger. The easiest way to identify them is they're marked on the striking end of the buffer. The one on the far left is a standard car buffer and they progressively get heavier to the right.



As for buffer springs, if you're running a full size (rifle) buttstock, I HIGHLY recommend the Tubbs/Superior Shooting flat coil chrome silicone spring. A picture of it is shown with the rifle length buffer in the top pic. I really like them. They should be standard equipment on AR's. They rock!!!
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks again guys, it sounds like it'll save a bunch of money to just drop a heavier buffer in there. But I still haven't heard any reports (problems or other wise) about the gas ring. As Nikion said it's possibly a myth about having the thre rings staggard but I was still wondering if anyone knows anything else on the matter.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Don't know if it's urban myth about the rings being staggered or not, but mine are and they work.

Don't really know what more to say.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Nice John, but you forgot the H3 the heaviest usually called a 9mm buffer, since thats what is usualy used for.

I run an H3 in mine and it's so tame even with a 7 inch barrel it's like shootin a .22LR.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Dave. I actually didn't forget it, I just don't have one. :lol:

If it does that much better with the cyclic action, maybe that'll change soon though.;-)
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Definatly worth a try. I can't build one without puting in an H3 now. was especially nice when the ol lady started shooting with me, it made it easyer for her to get accustom to, she was always very recoil sensitive.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Do you have any favorite places to get them from? It's not usually a regularly stocked piece.
 
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