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Discussion Starter #1
these are the 2 .308's I'm trying to choose between.

Description
"I have fired virtually every gas operated precision rifle in production and the DPMS Panther 308 is the most accurate "out of the box" gas operated rifle I have ever tested, with accuracy on par with most bolt action precision rifles. The fit and finish of the panther 308 is also first rate. Accuracy, quality construction and reasonable price make the Panther 308 a "best buy" in my opinion." - Charlie Cutshaw, Writer

Barrel:
24" Length
416 Stainless steel bull barrel
6 grooves, right-hand 1x10 twist,
button rifled
Chamber:
.308 Winchester
Method of Operation:
Gas operated rotating bolt
Bolt & Carrier:
8620 steel bolt carrier, heat treated
and plated per Mil Spec
Phosphated steel bolt, heat treated
and plated per Mil Spec
Sights:
None (mounting optics only)
Weight:
Empty - 11.20 lbs.
Length:
43.5"
Upper Receiver:
Thick walled, extruded from 6066-T6 aluminum
Hard coat anodized per Mil Spec and Teflon coated black
No dust cover
Snag free design, smooth side look
No shell deflector
No forward assist
Right hand ejection
Raised Picatinny rail for easy scope mounting
Lower Receiver:
Milled from a solid billet of 6061-T6 aluminum
Hard coat anodized per Mil Spec and Teflon coated black
integral trigger guard
Aluminum magazine release button
Standard AR-15 trigger group
Stock:
Standard A2 Black Zytel Mil Spec w/trap door assembly
Handguards:
Standard length ribbed free float tube.

or

Description
Barrel:
18" Length
4140 Chrome-moly steel bull barrel
6 grooves, right-hand 1x10 twist,
button rifled
Chamber:
.308 Winchester
Method of Operation:
Gas operated rotating bolt
Bolt & Carrier:
8620 steel bolt carrier, heat treated
and plated per Mil Spec
Phosphated steel bolt, heat treated
and plated per Mil Spec
Sights:
None (mounting optics only)
Weight:
Empty - 9.65 lbs.
Length:
37.5"
Upper Receiver:
Thick walled, extruded from 6066-T6 aluminum
Hard coat anodized per Mil Spec and Teflon coated black
No dust cover
Snag free design, smooth side look
No shell deflector
No forward assist
Right hand ejection
Raised Picatinny rail for easy scope mounting
Lower Receiver:
Milled from a solid billet of 6061-T6 aluminum
Hard coat anodized per Mil Spec and Teflon coated black
integral trigger guard
Aluminum magazine release button
Standard AR-15 trigger group
Stock:
Standard A2 Black Zytel Mil Spec w/trap door assembly
Handguards:
Carbine length ribbed free float tube.
 
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Discussion Starter #2
my local outdoor range is only 350 yards "knobb creek" I want it for target pratice but might like to try it out hunting. I like the ideal of the lighter 18" barrel but not sure if i should just go ahead and get the 24" if you guys were to choose between "these 2" which one would you get and why?

p.s. I would add a bi-pod and some type of scope not sure which on.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Let me just ask you this question: What kind of distances do you "eventually" want to take this rifle out to? If you want to stay in close, even out to 350, I'd say that you loading up some good quality .223 with some of the heavier bullets will take you out to those distances. Maybe you just need a different upper for your .223 and to start reloading for it. There are people that take the .223 with some of the heavier bullets out to 680 yards. If you want to go with a .308, I would NOT go with an 18" barrel. This is really gonna limit the powders that you can use optimally for this barrel. To be honest, I think most of them still won't completely burn before the end of the barrel. The .308 is already not really a fast round, and when you're cutting it down to an 18" barrel and then on a gas cycled rifle (bleeding off even more), I would say don't even mess with it if you're gonna go with an 18" barrel. Even in a bolt rifle, alot of guys won't go less than a 20" barrel if you plan on taking it long distance. If you plan on taking a 20" barrel out to 800 yards in a bolt rifle, you need 20 moa bases under your rifle scope and the bullet is just falling and doesn't carry too much kinetic energy.

I'm not trying to burst any bubbles, but I'm just trying to be realistic with ya. If you want to stay 350 yards or around there, I think you'd be better off with a heavy barreled .223 upper made to shoot the heavier bullets, and get into reloading. This would save you money on shooting your other AR-15 (which I'm assuming you shoot already), and allow you to push your .223 out further. The .223 is cheaper to shoot than the .308, and especially if you're punching paper, even out to 500, you can get the job done with the .223. You might not like the weight of the longer barrel, but if seriously want to shoot the .308 a little ways, you're gonna need more length than an 18" barrel.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
don't get me wrong, i love the ar platform; however if my choice for the 7.62NATO/.308 platform would have to be the Springfield Loaded M1A

http://www.springfield-armory.com/armory.php?version=46

it is easier to maintain, easier to CLEAN, and is scope ready. this rifle is a tack driver out to 500yds.

to me, it seems a littlre more balanced over all. when youre humping this out in the field in s*** all heat and humidty, you can feel the difference. Plus, it's easier to clean.

Another aspect, it's range presence is much more significant than the ar-10 platform. when you slide the M1A out of it's sleeve, all eyes immediately snap to it's graceful lines and vicious poise.

This is the Rifle that Wins Wars.
The M14 has been in service longer than the M16, so that should say something..

but thats just my humle opinion.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
well i have the 24" in 308 and i like it a lot, i shot it yesterday at a 100yds and got good results..here she is: i already replace the scope rings to a higher one..





 
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Discussion Starter #7
these are the 2 .308's I'm trying to choose between.

or


Apples and oranges.

One is designed for long range work and the other is a CQB/intermediate range rifle. I have my opinions on both but will reserve until you give us a clearer idea of what application you want the rifle for ie CQB/intermediate or deticated long range work. They are both fine platforms and you are on the right track, you just need to decide whether you want an apple or an orange.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
If the Marine Corps thought the M-14 was good enough to issue to me, then that's what I'll stick with.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
My way of seeing it, a DPMS LR will set you back around $1100. An M14 will set you back around $1300. Either way, it's not that much difference in cost to be worrying about for the advantages of the Springfield. I do like it's op system better anyway.

If you get the DPMS, personally I would prefer the longer barrel model better.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
My way of seeing it, a DPMS LR will set you back around $1100. An M14 will set you back around $1300. Either way, it's not that much difference in cost to be worrying about for the advantages of the Springfield. I do like it's op system better anyway.
Assuming you scope it, you forgot to include the $200+ mount for the M14, not to mention the ridiculous costs of accurizing those things.

Believe me, I'd love nothing more than the have an M14/M1a, but if I were going to put a scope on it, I wouldnt hesitate to get the DPMS.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Assuming you scope it, you forgot to include the $200+ mount for the M14, not to mention the ridiculous costs of accurizing those things.

Believe me, I'd love nothing more than the have an M14/M1a, but if I were going to put a scope on it, I wouldnt hesitate to get the DPMS.

mine didnt cost near that much.
i spent 125 for a springfield gen3 mount
took about hour to get it leveled and true.

put 10 rds at 25 yds then 10 at 100yds, and it will produce a dime group using 7.62NATO
 
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Discussion Starter #15
I have the DPMS LR-308 with the 24" barrel and love it. It only cost me $975 out the door. They make a wounderful gun. I have a Cabelas Alaskan Guide 3x12x52 scope and it shoots amaizing groups! It helped that I got the scope brand new for free!
 
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Discussion Starter #17
A true M-14 goes for big $$ so I settled for a M1A for about $1200
in the houston, tx area:
they base estimate is roughly 1549

and the loaded (better barrell and trigger, no selector switch cut out) is roughly 1699

but this rifle is worth every penny and then some. the only thing i'm not fond of is the lack of bayonet lug..for you know-- zombies:shock:
 
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Discussion Starter #18
don't get me wrong, i love the ar platform; however if my choice for the 7.62NATO/.308 platform would have to be the Springfield Loaded M1A

http://www.springfield-armory.com/armory.php?version=46

it is easier to maintain, easier to CLEAN, and is scope ready. this rifle is a tack driver out to 500yds.

to me, it seems a littlre more balanced over all. when youre humping this out in the field in s*** all heat and humidty, you can feel the difference. Plus, it's easier to clean.

Another aspect, it's range presence is much more significant than the ar-10 platform. when you slide the M1A out of it's sleeve, all eyes immediately snap to it's graceful lines and vicious poise.

This is the Rifle that Wins Wars.
The M14 has been in service longer than the M16, so that should say something..

but thats just my humle opinion.
The m1a looks cool for sure. I think it is outdated though. The m16 rifle is winning TODAY'S war. I don't want to offend you there. It sounds like you are an oldtimer that carried that rifle while serving back in the old days. What branch did you serve in? Sounds like you did time in the pacific or asia some place.Now I don't know about a 308 m16 style rifle, but with as good as the 5.56 is I say you can't go wrong.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
The m1a looks cool for sure. I think it is outdated though. The m16 rifle is winning TODAY'S war. I don't want to offend you there. It sounds like you are an oldtimer that carried that rifle while serving back in the old days. What branch did you serve in? Sounds like you did time in the pacific or asia some place.Now I don't know about a 308 m16 style rifle, but with as good as the 5.56 is I say you can't go wrong.
ill be 28 in a few weeks
no im not offended, you presented your opinion in a non-derogatory way, which is rare on the internet.

the M16 platform does have its strengths and weaknesses like all systems, but the M14 system has been de-mothballed(is that a word?) to help over come the 5.56NATO deficiencies. now, i'm not saying the M14 is w/o its own limitations, and faults; but ''technically'' it has been in service longer then the 16.

i prefer it for the main reason that (to me) its more reliable and a helluva lot easier to clean.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
The m1a looks cool for sure. I think it is outdated though. The m16 rifle is winning TODAY'S war. I don't want to offend you there. It sounds like you are an oldtimer that carried that rifle while serving back in the old days. What branch did you serve in? Sounds like you did time in the pacific or asia some place.Now I don't know about a 308 m16 style rifle, but with as good as the 5.56 is I say you can't go wrong.
Check around, you may be surprised how many "mothballed" M14's are finding their way back into service. It is not the newest design and it is not perfect but accurate .308 fire is nothing to scoff at.
 
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