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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am putting together peices for my next build and I am looking for a varmint type barrel.

I am most likely going to be shooting 55gr FMJ BTs out of it.

Any suggestions on length, twist, fluted, threaded, or places to get a decent barrel that isn't too expensive?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I took a good look at the RRA barrels but I am not crazy about the 1:8 and 1:12 options.

Some people say a faster twist is OK, some people don't.

To be honest I have no real preference so I have to sift through the opinions.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not gonna get into which barrels will be better for you AR, but I will tell a bit about "excessive twist". You can do what some people call "over stabilize" a bullet. Sometimes this results in a phenomenon that some people call a bullet "going to sleep". Sometimes you will shoot like a 1" group at 100 yards and can't get any better. Then when you shoot groups at 300 yards with the same load, you shoot 1.5" groups, which is .5 moa, when at 100 yards, you were shooting 1 moa. Sometimes people attribute this to over stabilizing a bullet and that it has not yet gone to "sleep" at 100 yards. Most people agree that there are other factors besides over stabilizing a bullet that cause this phenomenon, but that over stabilizing could be a partial cause. One that that over stabilizing bullets DOES cause for sure has to do with the bullet "nosing over". At the peak of it's trajectory, a bullet will nose over, meaning the bullet's nose changes from angling upwards to pointing downwards. Say you wanted to shoot heavier bullets and got a twist rate for such. When you fire some of the lightest bullets, they might be over stabilized and won't "nose over". This affects your long distance accuracy with the lighter bullets and might result in you seeing something that kind of looks like "keyholes" on paper targets. This is a result of the bullet nose staying up, NOT from a bullet tumbling. Keyholes have be made from bullet tumbling from not being stabilized enough, but if you over stabilize a bullet, it will not tumble, merely nose up. I recently purchased a barrel from Krieger (.30 caliber) that had a 1:11 twist to stabilize the 180-210 grain noslers and bergers primarily. I told the men at Krieger that I might sometimes be shooting some 155 grain scenars up close. He said that would be fine, but at 600 yards those bullets wouldn't be as accurate because they wouldn't nose over. Anyway, just thought I'd throw that out there for some that were curious or might need some help with that concept.
 
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