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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
O.k. the sig 556 isn't an AR-15 but its a "variant" of one. My friend has two AR-15. A Rock River standard and an Armilite with the bells and whistles. I'm new here but like the reviews I get here so I'm here for your opinion.

I know asking here maybe like asking in the main forum about Glocks so I hope you can be a bit impartial. The standard 556 sells for 1299. I know you can do alot with that when it comes to mod. an a.r.

Has anyone here had any first hand experience with this baby? From what I have heard its mint, but thats from hard core 556 owners. If you had that amount of money would you purchase one. Your opinions are welcome. thank you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
O.k. the sig 556 isn't an AR-15 but its a "variant" of one. My friend has two AR-15. A Rock River standard and an Armilite with the bells and whistles. I'm new here but like the reviews I get here so I'm here for your opinion.

I know asking here maybe like asking in the main forum about Glocks so I hope you can be a bit impartial. The standard 556 sells for 1299. I know you can do alot with that when it comes to mod. an a.r.

Has anyone here had any first hand experience with this baby? From what I have heard its mint, but thats from hard core 556 owners. If you had that amount of money would you purchase one. Your opinions are welcome. thank you.

Held it,
Shot it,
Didn't like it.

Too front heavy in my opinion, most of the gun feels like a toy to me.

Just personal preference, I'd rather have a nice gas piston AR at that price.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thank you. I have stated before that I'm new to most handguns (two glocks and a raging bull revolver) and don't know much of anything about AR-15.

this is a total newb ? but you stated gas piston. What did you mean by that. Sorry for my ill knowledge but I'm slowly learning. Thanks again.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Most people's complaint about the Sig 556 is that it's front heavy and the aftermarket parts for it are not very common.

He means it has a gas piston as it's return system. The AK-47 has a gas piston as well, that's what makes these weapons so reliable. The standard AR runs on a direct gas impingement system. It's a good system, but it must be cleaned often to run reliably.

However, there are a few companies out there that make the AR platform with a gas piston system (kinda like the Sig 556). But this is the exception to the rule as our military rifles use the gas impingement system.

So if you plan on keeping your gun clean and well lubed, a standard AR-15 variant will work for you.
If you want a beast of a rifle that will function while dirty, etc...find a varient of the AK-47. Like the Sig 556, Magpul Masada, Daewoo, HK 36, AK-47
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looked at it
Held it
Thought about buying it
Put it back on the table


Thought it looked cheesy, didn't care for the sights, would rather have an AR anyday :cool:
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the apeal to me is the gas piston operation. I am thinking that when I get my tax stamp back for my shorty AR, I am gonna do a piston conversion for it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
this is a total newb ? but you stated gas piston. What did you mean by that. Sorry for my ill knowledge but I'm slowly learning. Thanks again.
I don't consider myself to be the world's most foremost expert on the AR-15 or M-16 weapons system but I know enough to get by (or get me in trouble) so I'll try and break it down.

One of the biggest problems we've always faced with the standard AR-15 system is that, proverbially, it #*@# where it eats. The gas tube on the AR-15 comes all the way back to the gas key which sits atop the bolt carrier, so when you fire a round a good portion of the hot gases, along with all their crud come back through the gas tube and can deposit themselves either A) inside the tube which is small and a pain in the ass to clean, or B) On and around the bolt face, which can cause failures. This is not as common as some folks would have you believe. In normal worldly, and even battle field conditions routine maintenance can keep a good AR functioning flawlessly. However in an "END OF THE WORLD" sort of scenario, who can say how long you'll need to go without cleaning your rifle when the zombies attack :rolleyes:.

One of the more simple solutions to this problem has traditionally been to replace the gas tube with a gas piston. In this system, rather than the hot gas traveling all the way to the gas key, a modified bolt carrier is connected to a long metal rod with a piston at the end, the piston slides into or makes a seal with a cylinder which in turn is part of the gas block toward the front of the barrel. Now that hot gas simply presses on the piston to cycle the gun rather than the gas key ala AK-47 style. Pistons can be come quite filthy and sometimes corroded and continue to work flawlessly, one piston AR-15 at the gun shop I frequent has 10,000 of the dirtiest rounds through it I've ever seen without cleaning, and it still cycles flawlessly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
poor balance, lack off accessories, no standard sights atleast on the earlier ones they maybe corrected that. Lack of accessories.

I would like one in theory if they make the sights standard, and make use of all the obvious AR accessories out there instead of trying to reinvent the wheel. One hard core sig guy I read about said he ordered German sold not available in American hand guards that are much lighter and more ergonomic and that balanced it out.

I myself like the price if it was outfitted as I want from the start, I am not about to spend $500 for German hand guards, and steel sights. Have $2,000 into it and not even any fancy optics yet.

If you like the 556 also look into the LWRC as already mentioned and the Robinson arms XCR.

I like the LWRC especially in .308 it would solve some problems for me in a hurry. Pricey and I think fair value for what I get, still wish it was a few hundred cheaper and it would be no question what I would buy.

Robinson arms XCR is neat design, I only wish it was more popular or made by a bigger company, in the back of my mind I fear if I bought one when the SCAR or bushy/ magpul massada comes out it will kill the XCR and I would be stuck with a $1500 rifle and no parts for it.

Despite desperately wanting both a 5.56 and a 7.62 rifle these are the reasons I haven’t bought one yet.

Likely I will buy a FN FAL (next week or two) as I have settles on a kit and receiver and though not accurate as an AR with sub MOA I can get 2" out of the box easy .... and that’s good enough for shooting UN storm troopers, rioters, or gun grabbing commies. Won’t cost me but $800 before tax and transfer for the right arm of the free world. 90 countries adopted it so it should do me all right, and I can always get parts for it unlike an XCR. That’s how I see it. After I get 2 FN FALS a huge pile of ammo then I will buy what ever and if they stop making it I don’t give a crap.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't consider myself to be the world's most foremost expert on the AR-15 or M-16 weapons system but I know enough to get by (or get me in trouble) so I'll try and break it down.

One of the biggest problems we've always faced with the standard AR-15 system is that, proverbially, it #*@# where it eats. The gas tube on the AR-15 comes all the way back to the gas key which sits atop the bolt carrier, so when you fire a round a good portion of the hot gases, along with all their crud come back through the gas tube and can deposit themselves either A) inside the tube which is small and a pain in the ass to clean, or B) On and around the bolt face, which can cause failures. This is not as common as some folks would have you believe. In normal worldly, and even battle field conditions routine maintenance can keep a good AR functioning flawlessly. However in an "END OF THE WORLD" sort of scenario, who can say how long you'll need to go without cleaning your rifle when the zombies attack :rolleyes:.

One of the more simple solutions to this problem has traditionally been to replace the gas tube with a gas piston. In this system, rather than the hot gas traveling all the way to the gas key, a modified bolt carrier is connected to a long metal rod with a piston at the end, the piston slides into or makes a seal with a cylinder which in turn is part of the gas block toward the front of the barrel. Now that hot gas simply presses on the piston to cycle the gun rather than the gas key ala AK-47 style. Pistons can be come quite filthy and sometimes corroded and continue to work flawlessly, one piston AR-15 at the gun shop I frequent has 10,000 of the dirtiest rounds through it I've ever seen without cleaning, and it still cycles flawlessly.
The first sentence of your post is funny but true. I had no idea that the spent gases were directed there. That seems to be a HUGE problem that can be taken care of though. What is the price of the piston conversion? I saw the vid and can see why the sig. is so popular. But if I can build an ar with the same reliability and maybe get me some nice optics then I would go with the AR over the Sig. I guess this will be my next purchase and seeing as how I buy on a budget I guess piecing a quality AR-15 makes more sense. thanks for the info.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know the posts from this forum are from almost 2 years ago. However, in case anyone is reading this, here are my thoughts.

I just purchased a Sig Sauer 556 with the tri rail front grip and holo sight.


Paid $1299 online. With the $300 rebate from Sig, the price comes down to $999. I've wanted an AR platform rifle for some time. I went with the 556 based on reviews, the features, the Sig reputation for quality, the gas piston system & the reliability that comes with it, the multitude of aftermarket options & mounting possibilities, and the accuracy, handling and feel of the weapon. The fact that I can shoot steel cased ammo through it is a major plus ($215 for 1,000 rounds vs. $450+ for 600-900 rounds of brass). Despite the fact that I keep my weapons clean, the reliability of the gas piston system means I'm able to shoot whatever I put through it without the likelyhood of jamming or misfiring and it'll endure some pretty punishing conditions.

I've heard the complaints of how heavy the front end is. From what I've seen, that is more of a problem on the SWAT model with the one-piece quad rail (I have the lighter tri-rail in the photo). Personally, a little extra weight towards the front means additional stability in terms of aiming/target acquisition & delivering rounds accurately down range. I'll sacrifice having to carry the pound or so difference from other AR platform guns for having a weapon that I know will do what I need it to do, whenever I need it to do so.

Sure, you can spend a few hundred less for a tactical AR-15 & a holo sight. But you get what you pay for. For me, it was worth waiting a little longer, doing the research, and spending a bit more. One of my coworkers has an Armalite AR-15. Since he purchased it several years ago and put thousands of rounds through it, he has had frequent problems, replaced ejectors, usually experiences jams several times whenever he takes it on the range. And he keeps it clean as a whistle. I've heard of people putting 10K rounds or more through gas piston systems w/out cleaning & they still fire w/out problems. Sure, I've heard people who have had problems with gas piston systems & the sig 556. But they are few and far between compared to the number of those who have them.

Ultimately, you need to find the rifle that works for you. No one gun will work perfectly for everyone. The Sig 556 does so for me.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sure, you can spend a few hundred less for a tactical AR-15 & a holo sight. But you get what you pay for. For me, it was worth waiting a little longer, doing the research, and spending a bit more. One of my coworkers has an Armalite AR-15. Since he purchased it several years ago and put thousands of rounds through it, he has had frequent problems, replaced ejectors, usually experiences jams several times whenever he takes it on the range. And he keeps it clean as a whistle. I've heard of people putting 10K rounds or more through gas piston systems w/out cleaning & they still fire w/out problems. Sure, I've heard people who have had problems with gas piston systems & the sig 556. But they are few and far between compared to the number of those who have them.
You do know, I hope, that the ArmaLite of today, who I assume produced your friend's rifle, is not the same company that invented the AR15/M16 in the late 50s. It has changed hands and been reorganised many times. It is not, at least in my opinion, a top tier maker of AR rifles any longer. While piston guns have their place, a well made DI AR can run thousands of rounds with no malfunctions. There are even a few that have done it (test cases by well known trainers) with no cleaning, just constant re-lubing.

It's unfair to hold up a poorly made ArmaLite product and condemn all ARs.
 
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