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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody...

Had a question. I might be picking up an AR15/M4 type rifle in the near future. Not sure if it'll be new/used... just kinda in the market for one.

Assuming it IS new... i've heard mention on some threads about "breaking in the barrel", etc.

How exactly does one go about doing that? Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I just saw an episode of Shooting USA that said one bullet, then run a wetted patch, then 2 bullets, then run a wetted patch, then 3, etc. until you get to 50 rounds.

I'm sure someone more qualified will give a better answer.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Kind of depends on whether you are looking for target accuracy from that AR.

If you are looking for super accuracy, you will want to burnish away any tool marks in the bore by following a program as mentioned above - fire a shot, clean the bore, etc.

If you are not interested in super accuracy, that is if you are satisfied with the average accuracy for that particular gun, a minute of angle let's say, then you can probably just go ahead and shoot it.

Break in scenarios for guns are like break in scenarios for guns, highly individual and anal.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Barrel break-in is an urban legend full of superstition and voodoo. You should always clean and lube a new gun before shooting it, but after that I don’t think it matters much for normal barrels. Chrome-lined barrels on ARs are a little different. Because they can’t get the thickness of the of the plating even through the whole barrel, there is some “break-in” required to even things out and knock-down the high spots.

Bushmaster recommends that you not clean your chrome-lined barrel until after the first 200 rounds. How’s that for break-in!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have 2 identical Savage 17HMR's that we did a long and tedious barrel break in process on one, and then just shot the other. Let me tell you, there is no difference in accuracy. You might be able to squeeze a little bit extra accuracy by breaking in the barrel but it'll be small.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I followed the mantra of elite barrel break in for my Savage 93. http://www.savagearms.com/93r17gv.htm. That is, for a while. The first 10 shots I took with it, I cleaned the barrel according to Savage's website, then shot a 3 shot group and cleaned. After the 3-shot group, I said "to hell with this, this thing is shooting great. Break in complete." So, really, I don't know if it matters much, especially on an AR that doesn't have a "target barrel" and also if you're buying one used. A lot of people swear by polishing the hell out of the bore before ever shooting it using flitz or a different polish of some sort. This seems to be a shortcut to breaking in a new bbl that works extremly well and is a lot faster than shoot-clean-shoot-clean method. I'm still on the fence as to which method is best or if it should even be worried about. It depends on the gun... if I'm shooting a bolt-action varmint gun in .243 or something, I'm going to break the bbl in exactally as the manufacturer recommends, no questions asked. If it's a new standard build AR-15 w/ out a fancy barrel o fany sort, I'd just clean it initially, then hit the range.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
nightraider said:
chupacabrachus said:
I suppose I could have posted a link to the savage site..

http://www.savagearms.com/cs_barrel.htm
We did that exact procedure on the first Savage 17HMR I bought. Second one I just to hell with this and shot it, both are accurate as can be.
Thats it, just shoot the damn thing. Its not a new engine....you ask it to do one thing...shoot, the accuracy is up to you. The real secret is to not heat it up too fast or for too long for the first couple a hundred rounds. You heat it up too fast with sustained fire and you take a chance on burnung out the rifling. i have done that on a brand new DSA FAL once......
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've read a lot about this and have come to the conclusion myself that barrel break in is mostly a crock. Just my opinion, yours may vary.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I only did half of the break-in for my savage 93. I saw it was shooting fine while I was following the procedure and decided it's not going to get worse if I quit cleaning between shots. It still shoots fine so it must not have hurt anything. I still think if I was breaking in a 2,000 dollar match rifle or varmint rifle, I'd break it in as the manufacturer recommends. However, my savage was a 200 dollar rifle.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thanks for all the info, everybody.

yeah, if the gun's used, it's a moot point. the gun will probably be more for pleasure and "maybe" defense (i'm thinking the shottie will serve that purpose better... then there's the XDs :lol: ) I do want something that can reach out there a little bit and be pretty accurate at least at 100-150 yds.

i'm thinking i might bite the bullet and get one from one of the local shops. i've gotten 2 of my guns from gander mountain and don't want to do business w/ them again... i'm usually the big online guy but want to support the local merchants. just need to find some sort of guarantee, at least for 30 days or something, so i don't pick up a used lemon.

thanks again!
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've bought at least 3 of my guns from Gander and like their service actually. To my knowledge though, or at least the 2 Ganders in Houston, AR's aren't carried.

If you do buy an AR though, I'd HIGHLY recommend just building it yourself. Get a complete upper and a stripped lower + parts kit.
 
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